December 16, 2013 through January 23, 2014

An Opening reception will be held on Monday, December 16

7pm to 10 pm

Once the land of a noble, proud people, Mother Africa has found itself under siege from the effects of social globalization and its fall out. The inhabitants of one of the final havens of natural beauty are inundated with the by-product of our ever-increasing hunger for technological advancement. Thus turning this beautiful landscape into a dumping ground for toxic waste.

It raises the question, is it not our duty to reflect on the role we play in this our globalized world?

Our two fine art photographers in this exhibition, Mario Marino and Kai Löffelbein explore this controversial question with alternately tribal authenticity in the face of a hard-hitting reality.

Kai Löffelbein (born in 1981) is an award winning freelance photographer, currently residing in Hannover,
Germany. He has studied political science in Berlin and later photojournalism and documentary photography in Hannover and worked in various countries in South America, Asia, Africa and Eastern Europe. Through documentary photography, Löffelbein shows the effects of socio-political and economic processes on the common people. He is committed to Concerned Photography. “My images always take sides. Their aim is not only to draw people’s attention to various social grievances but also to make us realize our own responsibility in a globalized world”, says the photographer. His work has been exhibited internationally in numerous festivals as well as placing first in several prestigious award shows.

Mario Marino (born in 1967) is a celebrated travel portrait photographer, Austrian born and residing in Germany. Marino has been photographing various peoples in their native lands since 2000. His work is exhibited in numerous galleries around the world amongst them the prestigious Leica Galerie Salzburg. Central to his photos is a fascinating portraiture in which he maintains an empathetic connection to his subjects. Each image conveys a sense of simple joy of being and living in the world. “To me it’s essential to show the beauty and dignity of people. I really do love people. I’m fascinated by their cultural background and identity”, states Marino. A positive view of mankind prevails headless of outside influence; victory of the human spirit.