December 9, 2010 – January 9, 2011 (extended due to popular demand)

The Worst Journey in the World

 – Captain Scott’s Antarctic expedition 1910 -1913

by Herbert Ponting

‘All daydreams must go’
In 1910, the Terra Nova expedition set itself the glorious task of conquering the South Pole. Captain Robert Falcon Scott led a group of men in a long and excruciating venture, which ultimately ended with their tragic death. Scott and his men died on their way back from the Pole, overcome by extreme cold, exhaustion and starvation. Before beginning their fatal trip back, they had made the bitter discovery of not being the first ones to reach their destination, preceded by several weeks by the Norwegian expedition led by Roald Amundsen. “All the daydreams must go”, wrote Scott in his diary.

But the dreams, the ambitions and the beauty of Scott’s journey did not fade away: Herbert G. Ponting, recruited as ‘camera artist’ for the Terra Nova expedition, left us over 1700 glass plate negatives as a testimony of the Antarctic venture, now marking its centennial anniversary.

Experts team up for a unique project
The Empty Quarter gallery has teamed up with Salto Ulbeek Publishers to present the Ponting Project: an exhibition of platinum prints from the Herbert G. Ponting Archive held by the Scott Polar Research Institute at the University of Cambridge, a portfolio of 48 prints and six booklets with essays by leading experts on Captain Scott’s expeditions, and three films, one of which by Ponting himself.

Limited edition Portfolio
The portfolio comes in a limited edition of 50 and it is divided into 5 thematic sections: Explorers, Man and Sledge, Terra Nova, Cape Evans and Antarctic Landscapes. The platinum printing process, a photographic technique renowned for its exceptional aesthetic and archival properties, provides the greatest tonal range of any printing method using chemical development.